Lowered Expectations or What?

Did African-Americans  lower their  expectations  or are they just facing  facts?  Can Blacks make the cut as a  respected people in  multi-cultural America?  After the Great Recession and seeing the electing  of a Black president rendered nolo contendere;  What are black people’s thoughts for the future?

African-American children are just as smart as any other children, right?  The lazy Black man is certainly just a myth and the sex-crazed, child neglecting black women is just a character in white-supremacist propaganda. 

There seems to be a lack  of visible outrage in the Black community in light of the fact that Black  people continuously have the highest unemployment numbers in the country, the lowest percentage of college students, the highest incarceration rates,  the lowest number of two-parent households, the list is really long. Notwithstanding, if you have occasion to talk with African-Americans these things are not what they are talking about; why is that?  Have Africans in American finally accepted that they are truly inferior?

Most American ethnic groups respond vociferously when forces impact them in a negative way.  With little more than a whimper coming out of the Black communities these days can one assume that Black people don’t know how bad their condition is, don’t care,  or maybe when you expect nothing that’s just what you get.

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5 responses to “Lowered Expectations or What?

  1. Black people must raise their expectations. If people expect poverty, criminality and ignorance, that’s what they get. Black people don’t expect wealth, health and love and when they don’t get it they are not even upset because they were not expecting it anyway. When you expect something and don’t get it, this leads to dissapointment, which leads you to take some action; Action generates change. Black people have recently kind of just laid back and let other people and situations define them instead of continuously defining and re-defining themselves. This is not what the forces of creation came together to manifest. In this writer’s humble opinon, the first step in solving any problem is ackowledging that there is a problem. Knock and the door shall be opened; if not, knock harder. Peace

  2. Ok….we acknowledge there is a problem. What’s next! We know and see what is going on. What is the proposed ACTION?

    We can’t keep sitting here saying, “Look everybody, this is bad, that is bad, oh woe is the Black community” without putting something together to ACT on. Sadly most people living in our city don’t see there is a problem so people like us have to open their eyes instead of waiting for their eyes to automatically open. It’s not going to happen. So people like us have to intervene. They can’t redefine anything if they don’t know what it is they are supposed to be defining. They don’t know there is a better life outside of the one they are living. It gets passed down from generation to generation. We have to end the cycle and not wait on them to define anything. As far as they know, it’s been defined for them already.

    We are past the “acknowledging” the problem stage. Time is out for all that. It’s time to make changes. FIX the problem.

  3. The course of action has to be formed around the particular objective. Black people are not a monolithic entity. People have different life experiences, different values and are going to have different ideas about how to get to where they want to be. The common objectives are where the community starts. One does not have to re-invent the wheel. We have models of successful societies. Economic control in our communities is one goal, then there is education, etc. The problems are known; there is no magic wand. One can’t tire of discourse, however, because all action starts as a thought and people are smarter than they act. The first revolutionary act is always in the personal space. Whatever good one would like to see in the community one must exhibit themselves.

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