NAACP Introduces Alternative Milwaukee County Redistricting Proposal


At Community Brainstorming earlier today, the NAACP introduced an alternative map to be considered in the redistricting of the Milwaukee County political districts.  The map and and its demographics are below.

MILWAUKEE COUNTY 10TH DISTRICT ELECTION: 20 QUESTIONS WITH CAVALIER JOHNSON


cav

1. What is your current occupation?

I am currently employed full time as a Follow-Up Specialist with the Milwaukee Area Workforce Investment Board (MAWIB) and part time as the Interim Collegiate Services Director for the Sponsor-A-Scholar (SAS) program offered by the YMCA of Metropolitan Milwaukee.

2. How old are you?
I am 24 years old.

3. Please tell us a bit more about yourself.
I am a Milwaukee man, born and raised. When I was born, I was brought to a flat in the Washington Park neighborhood where my parents and great grandmother lived. My folks split when I was about three years old and I lived primarily with my mother over the years. I was fortunate in that my father has always been a constant in my life even after parting ways with my mom.

We didn’t have much growing up. I can remember moving from home to home when I was younger. Going past today, many of the places where my family and I lived over the years have either been torn down or are boarded up. It wasn’t until I was a middle school student that I was able to remain at one school from start until finish. I finished K-12 education by graduating from Bay View High School here in Milwaukee – the school where my father also earned his high school diploma.

Just before entering high school, I was selected to be a part of a pre-college program for low income MPS students called Sponsor-A-Scholar. The program, offered by Milwaukee’s Downtown YMCA, pairs each participant with adult, professional mentor and really presents urban youth with the idea that they too, can achieve a college education. SAS, in my opinion, also helps to groom young people to be mindful of the community that surrounds them and to realize that we are all partners in moving our community forward. Active service to Milwaukee is a key function of the program and has largely helped to make me into who I am today.

After working and/or volunteering in places like Madison, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Chile, London and New York City, I went on to graduate from the University of Wisconsin.

4. Why do you want to be a County Supervisor?
I want to be a County Supervisor because at a very young age, I realized that active participation in our politics is the key to creating effective change in the lives of ordinary citizens. I’ll never forget the day that I discovered this. I was 14 years old. Now, at 24 years, that same mantra of service to people and service to my community has driven me to this point in life.

5. Why are you the right candidate for the job?
I think that I am the right candidate for the job because I possess an unwavering commitment to Milwaukee. I’ve been lucky enough to travel extensively in my days but the beginning and the end of every adventure is the same – Milwaukee. This is my home, and I care deeply about its future and the people that reside here.

When we look at tough choices, I’ll make informed decisions with proper counsel and with the people of Milwaukee in mind. I’m the right candidate for the job because I will do what is best for Milwaukee and include our residents in the process.

6. As County Board Supervisor, what would your main priorities be?
As a County Board Supervisor:

I’d look to work on development both in Park East as well as the Milwaukee County Parks.

I look forward to working with partners to tackle the problems facing the Milwaukee County Transit System. Steadily increasing fares and cuts in service are not engines for growth.

I want to work at finding and eliminating duplicity in services that are offered by Milwaukee County and the several municipalities.

I’d want to establish a Milwaukee County-wide Youth Supervisory Board that gives young people that really want to work at addressing issues that face youth throughout our county a platform to do so. This tool will also help to hone the skills of young people that desire to serve the public through government.

I’d work closely with Milwaukee County workers and the taxpayers that pay their wages to find real, long term solutions to the fiscal order of Milwaukee County.

I would focus attention on economic development and ensuring that Milwaukee County is doing all that it can to make sure that businesses not only set up shop here, but that they are able to grow and create new spaces and new jobs in Milwaukee County.

I’d also like to work side by side with residents, and engage the constituency by getting them involved in the politics that govern them.

7. What are your main priorities for the 10th District specifically?
I want to work at addressing the issue of boarded homes in our neighborhoods.

I’d like to work with area businesses and law enforcement to encourage cleaner, safer streets.

I want to study the Neighborhood Investment Club model in place near 24th ST between Locust ST and Chambers ST and encourage this sort of neighborhood engagement throughout the district.

I look to work where we can to make district neighborhoods more inviting by tapping into resources that help to create improvements to homes and neighborhoods.

I would like to create an active Q&A session inspired by Prime Minister’s Questions (PMQ) that takes place each Wednesday in the Houses of Parliament in London. The sessions that would take place here would be monthly at the outset, and will allow for district residents to be able to have direct, unfiltered dialogue with me, their elected representation on a whole range of issues with respect to our community and our county governance.

Outside of this, I plan to work as an active representative that isn’t only accessible in a monthly Q&A forum. I will definitely be both visible and approachable on the streets and in neighborhoods throughout the district.

8. What will you bring to the County Board that you feel it currently does not have?
I’ll bring to the County Board a young perspective and a willingness to try, try again until we find solutions to the problems facing our community. I dreaded math so much in high school that it was my mission to make sure that I never had to pick up a math course while studying at college in Madison. Even though I didn’t like math all that much, I still kept at it. I worked with a tutor and found that through all of the frustrations associated with math, there is an equation to every problem – no matter how big or how small.

9. Who are your role models?
Role Models for me are far ranging from family to friends to folks that I have watched over the years. It was my intention to serve as the first Black American President of the United States. Obviously that can’t happen now, but Barack Obama is a role model because he is the embodiment of a dream that hope to reach one day. Also, President Obama has stubborn faith in and support of the American people that I think is inspiring.

A good friend of mine, who is an MPS teacher, Victor Amaya is also a role model. Victor is a role model because his successes are the hopes and dreams of millions of people that have come to United States over centuries. Folks come to the US because there is no other place where your dreams are as attainable. Victor came to the United States and is now giving back to the community as a teacher – exactly what he wanted to do. He is living his American Dream.

My parents are role models, each for their own respective reasons. My mom has fought through years and years of hardship and is still standing ready. My father taught me an important lesson that I have been spreading since I learned it. That lesson is that if you’re young and especially a Black male, you should get off of your block. Take the time to travel and to experience new environments so you know what the world has to offer. Sometimes Central City youth are trapped to the confines of what happens on “the block”. My dad taught me that it’s important that we don’t allow this perception to become our entire worldview, and that’s why he is a role model.

10. Which locally elected official, if any, would you pattern your legislative style after?
I don’t know if there is any one official in particular that I would pattern myself after. I like Common Council President Willie Hines’ presence at community functions; I enjoy Senator Taylor’s passion; I’m a fan of Alderman Donovan’s active role on the streets of his district. Being able to pull from traits of several officials would help me to find a more concrete and direct answer.

11. What would you do to uplift the black community?
To uplift the Black community, I would tell my story and help Black Milwaukeeans to realize the connection. From childhood through to adulthood, I’ve faced challenges and have been able to overcome. Sometimes, folks assume that I am not a Milwaukeean judging by the sound of my voice alone. Time and again, folks wonder what connection that I have to the struggles of Black Milwaukeeans.

Like I mentioned before, growing up in Central City Milwaukee was not always a joy. I’ve seen and heard it all – shootings, stabbings, stealing, stompings, swear words and everything else that a rough life can throw at you. After living in a family on the brink of poverty and being a transient student, I went on to graduate from a great college and travel around the world.
What makes me different from anyone else in our community? I can’t tell. So what I’m saying is that if I can overcome the struggles facing the Black community, if I can recognize that your surroundings don’t make you who you are, but your tenacity, your will and your character are what define you, then I am confident that folks in our greater community can do it too.

12. Milwaukee County is facing extreme short-term and long-term budgetary pressures while trying to maintain and/or improve county services. As a County Board Supervisor, what would you do to tackle this dilemma?
Well, I think that what we have seen is that these so called “quick fixes” are not the answer to budgetary woes facing Milwaukee County. Reports show that without overhaul, every dollar of the county tax levy will be focused on pension and healthcare compensation.

We cannot move forward without really looking at viable corrections to the county’s obligations – obligations that allow for the county to award its workers with what they have earned over years of service. In the future, these costs need to be reconciled with what Milwaukee County taxpayers can afford to pay.

I think that working to get government on a balanced approach where we streamline services, eliminate duplicity, provide better economic development solutions to expand our tax base, and work to make tackling the rising costs of healthcare and pension benefits are among the things that we can focus on to secure financial footing at Milwaukee County.

13. Numerous individuals have floated the idea of downsizing Milwaukee County government or consolidating the county with municipalities and with the state. Where do you stand on this issue?
Let me start this answer by saying that more doesn’t necessarily mean better. Places like Maricopa County, AZ and San Diego County, CA each have five County Supervisors with populations of at least one million more residents than Milwaukee County.

Reducing the size of the Milwaukee County Board may serve to allow for more cooperation, and more business for Supervisors to tend to. If the County Board has not been producing intended results with a number as large as 19 then downsizing the size of the board to encourage greater productivity is something that I would support.

14. Would you approve of the privatization of any county services? In what circumstances? Why?
I am not in fully in favor of privatizing services provided by Milwaukee County but in some situations, I think that it privatization should be deemed allowable as a cost cutting measure.

I don’t support privatization entirely because in some cases, what privatization results in is people from elsewhere being appointed to take jobs from Milwaukee County residents. Otherwise, what happens is that those that have already been working for Milwaukee County are forced to do the same day’s work for less pay and less coverage.

I am not of the opinion that, to give a scenario, a middle aged Milwaukee woman that makes $11.00/hr sweeping floors afterhours at the Courthouse should, after years of service, be forced to sweep the same floors but now for $8.00/hr because her job was privatized.

If we somehow were able to work with separate organizations and/or trusts to operate some of our cultural institutions while protecting the compensation of employees and simultaneously cuts costs for the county, I’d support that.

15. Metro Milwaukee is arguably the most segregated metro area in the country. Is this a problem? If so, what would you do about it as a County Board Supervisor? If it is not a problem, why not?
I think that integrated neighborhoods are excellent. These neighborhoods show that people of different religions and races can live in harmony. Diverse neighborhoods help people living in them to adapt to the customs and traditions of the world that surrounds us. They are great!

But that’s not to say that ethnic neighborhoods need to be merged into one another. I think that having distinct neighborhoods allows for culture and flavor to blend together and really give a neighborhood its own unique feel.

So long as we can all coexist with one another, I don’t see any absolute necessity as to why we all need to live right next door to one another. Diversity is great, and I encourage it. But ethnicity is great too, and I also support that.

16. The recent census will provide Milwaukee County with the opportunity to engage in redistricting. Meanwhile, many people have called for downsizing the size of the County Board. Where do you stand on this issue? In the event of a downsize, would you be willing to put your own seat on the chopping block?
To reiterate what from question 13, I would support a downsizing of the Milwaukee County Board because more doesn’t always mean better.

The way that I think redistricting and a smaller board would work is that new lines are drawn, and every elected official would have to go before voters in order to earn a spot on the new, smaller Milwaukee County Board. So in essence, all Supervisors would be giving up the seats that they hold.

Yes, I’d be willing to put my own seat on the chopping block because I’m interested in doing what is best for Milwaukee. If doing what is best for Milwaukee means putting the seat that I’ve been elected to on the chopping block to create a more productive government, then so be it.

17. It is estimated that in six years, the county’s pension and healthcare obligations will eat up every dollar of the county tax levy. Meanwhile, there is talk of changing the county’s pension system to a 401(k) style system. Given the alarming fiscal issues that the county is contending with, where do you stand on this pension issue?
I think that it is so important that we get a grip on costs that the county has to endure where it relates to pensions, healthcare and other legacy obligations. I’ve read that there are three big public systems in Wisconsin – one for state employees; one for employees of the City of Milwaukee; and one for the employees of Milwaukee County. If we have models at the state level and municipal level that, as far as I know, operate with solvency, then why can’t we implement something similar for Milwaukee County?

I mentioned before, we need to work to reconcile Milwaukee County’s financial obligations with what taxpayers in Milwaukee County can afford. The financial problems at the county level remind me of a lesson from the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. Both sides possessed such a vast array of weaponry that if one side escalated their tensions into an all-out Hot War, there would have been Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD). You can only tax folks so much and that is why we need to get the financial house in order at Milwaukee County. If we don’t get our books in order, then instead of global superpower vs. global superpower, we’ll have residents of Milwaukee County vs. Milwaukee County government – and since modern society cannot function without some form of governance, and a government cannot function without support of the people in its jurisdiction, we arrive at Mutually Assured Destruction.

18. Define Milwaukee in five words or less.
Promise, Potential, Home

19. Define Milwaukee’s challenges in five words or less.
Jobs, Education, Appreciation, Opportunity

20. As County Supervisor, how would you encourage active citizen participation within the county and within your district?
Here I would revisit my fascination with Prime Minister’s Questions. Rather than PMQ, I’d call these informative town hall-style meetings SQ (Supervisor’s Questions) sessions. This straight to the point sort of dialogue I think, will really allow me to find what the residents of the 10th District want addressed by their elected representation at the level of County Government. It has the workings to be a great tool to pull people into the conversation and really get them involved in what happens in their government.

This outreach shouldn’t stop with current voters though. Extending the opportunity for young people to get involved in our politics with a Milwaukee County Youth Supervisory Board will not only help to create awareness in a demographic that is usually out of tune with what happens in politics, but also will help to mold future leaders in Milwaukee.

If elected, I’d really enjoy my duty of taking to the streets of my district and speaking directly to residents there. I’ve always found it alarming when our elected leaders are only seen on television but never in the grocery store or even walking down their district’s main street. It makes it seem as if we’re represented by folks that aren’t actually a part of our community. I will be different. If elected, I can promise you that I will continue to be on your streets and in your neighborhoods.

MILWAUKEE COUNTY 10TH DISTRICT ELECTION: INVITATION TO THE CANDIDATES


Just a few weeks after the recent election season ended, the next election season has already begun. The race to replace Elizabeth Coggs, who will be leaving Milwaukee County’s 10th district to represent the 10th district of the state assembly, is on. Already, Cavalier “Chevy” Johnson has thrown his hat into the ring. Other candidates are sure to follow.

As was done with the 2nd district special election, TMD is inviting all the candidates to play 20 questions. Simply answer the questions below and send them to TMD. Your responses will be published, unedited, in a separate post.

  1. What is your current occupation?
  2. How old are you?
  3. Please tell us a bit more about yourself.
  4. Why do you want to be a County Supervisor?
  5. Why are you the right candidate for the job?
  6. As County Board Supervisor, what would your main priorities be?
  7. What are your main priorities for the 10th District specifically?
  8. What will you bring to the County Board that you feel it currently does not have?
  9. Who are your role models?
  10. Which locally elected official, if any, would you pattern your legislative style after?
  11. What would you do to uplift the black community?
  12. Milwaukee County is facing extreme short-term and long-term budgetary pressures while trying to maintain and/or improve county services. As a County Board Supervisor, what would you do to tackle this dilemma?
  13. Numerous individuals have floated the idea of downsizing Milwaukee county government or consolidating the county with municipalities and with the state. Where do you stand on this issue?
  14. Would you approve of the privatization of any county services? In what circumstances? Why?
  15. Metro Milwaukee is arguably the most segregated metro area in the country. Is this a problem? If so, what would you do about it as a County Board Supervisor? If it is not a problem, why not?
  16. The recent census will provide Milwaukee County with the opportunity to engage in redistricting. Meanwhile, many people have called for downsizing the size of the County Board. Where do you stand on this issue? In the event of a downsize, would you be willing to put your own seat on the chopping block?
  17. It is estimated that in six years, the county’s pension and healthcare obligations will eat up every dollar of the the county tax levy. Meanwhile, there is talk of changing the county’s pension system to a 401(k) style system. Given the alarming fiscal issues that the county is contending with, where do you stand on this pension issue?
  18. Define Milwaukee in five words or less.
  19. Define Milwaukee’s challenges in five words or less.
  20. As County Supervisor, how would you encourage active citizen participation within the county and within your district?

Good luck to all of the candidates!

Race Matters in Milwaukee: Segregation and Education


It has been suggested that education is the civil rights issue of our time, and there is no question that the black community continues to lag behind when it comes to all matters of education. This is especially so here in Milwaukee, where MPS reading scores lag behind those of other major urban school districts, state black reading scores are the worst in the nation, and the percent of blacks with a college education is lower here than it is in most other places. These are crisis-level facts.

This has not completely escaped the community’s notice. Everybody understands the importance of improving Milwaukee Public Schools. And while massive disagreement concerning proposed changes ultimately resulted in the prevailing of the status quo, rather than some sort of meaningful compromise or reform, at least the community showed that it was energized and willing to fight for local education.

But one thing that seems to continue to escape notice, maybe since the time that Chapter 220 was created, is the impact that segregation has on education.

Segregation and 4th Grade Reading Scores

The landmark study on segregation by the U.S Census Bureau ranked several dozen metro areas in terms of how segregated each is. Meanwhile, the Trial Urban District Assessment ranked 18 participating urban school districts in various standardized test scores. In total, 14 metro areas, including Milwaukee, were included in both studies. Each of these urban school districts contends with the issues of poverty and parenting that are frequently cited as the primary reasons for MPS’ struggles.

The graph below shows the level of segregation and the 2009 black 4th grade reading scores of the 14 districts that were included in both studies.

The link between segregation and black 4th grade reading scores is “significant” at the 99% level, and segregation “explains” 45% of the variance in the reading scores. Note also that the link between segregation and overall reading scores (for all races) is significant at the 95% level and explains 37% of the variance in the reading scores. Milwaukee black 4th grade median reading score was second worst, ahead of only Detroit.

Segregation and Bachelor’s Degrees

The yearly American Community Survey keeps track of how many people ages 25 and older have acquired a bachelor’s degree. The graph below shows metro area segregation and the percent of the black population within the metro area that has a bachelor’s degree, averaged from 2006 to 2008. The correlation is significant at the 99% level and explains 32% of the variance in the percent of the black population that has a bachelor’s degree.

In this time, 12.3% of the black population in metro Milwaukee had a bachelor’s degree, the worst out of all of the metro areas included in the segregation study.

The graph below shows metro area segregation and the white/black bachelor’s degree disparity, defined as the ratio of percent of white people with a degree divided by percent of black people with a degree. Once again, correlation is significant at the 99% level and this time explains 30% of the variance in the white/black disparity.

Metro Milwaukee’s white/black degree disparity of 2.79 (34.3%/12.3%) was the worst out of all the metro areas in the segregation study.

What Does It Mean?

It is pretty clear that segregation and poor education outcomes correlate with one another. This does not prove that segregation causes poor education outcomes, or even that poor education outcomes cause segregation. But, as is the case with other socioeconomic indicators, segregation can be tied to the problems of Milwaukee that we all experience and are concerned with. It will be hard to move Milwaukee forward in jobs and education without impacting our segregation. With all of the talk about jobs and education during this election season, this is something that ought to be kept in mind.

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Race Matters in Milwaukee

Part I: How Segregated is Milwaukee?

Part Ia: How Segregated is Milwaukee? Part 2

Part II: The Causes of Milwaukee’s Segregation

Part III: The Effects of Milwaukee’s Segregation

Part IV: Segregation and Education

Race Matters in Milwaukee: How Segregated is Milwaukee? Part 2


It turns out that Milwaukee is not the most segregated metro area after all.

 

Racial Map of Milwaukee

 

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Racial Map of Detroit

 

(Both graphics by Eric Fisher)

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The landmark report on segregation by the U.S Census Bureau published five measure of segregation. As previously discussed, this report ranked metro areas with a sufficiently large black population on how racially segregated they were. Then, the U.S Census Bureau averaged these rankings, and used that average to conclude that Milwaukee was the most segregated metro area in the country.

After all of the sophisticated statistical analysis that went into the production of the five segregation measures, it is surprising that the U.S Census Bureau would produce an overall segregation rank by averaging the segregation measure ranks, and not the measures themselves. As the following example shows, this distorts things.

Imagine three people whose wealth is measured in three different ways. You want to rank them in overall wealth by averaging their wealth from each measurement. In parenthesis below is the rank of how wealthy each person is compared to the other two people.



If you’re just averaging the money in each measurement, Aaron is the wealthiest person and would rank number one. But if you average the rankings, Brett’s average ranking (the average of 1, 1, and 2) is better than Aaron’s average ranking (the average of 1, 2, and 2).

Detroit is like Aaron. It has the worst segregation measures, but not the worst average ranking. Milwaukee is like Brett. We do not have the worst segregation measures, but we do have the worst average ranking.

When the segregation measures are standardized and averaged, Detroit comes out as the most segregated metro area in the country. Milwaukee comes out at number two. Here are the top five segregated metro areas using this way to measure:

The U.S Census Bureau may have had a good reason for going with their method. And, none of this changes the fact that Milwaukee is highly segregated, and that this remains a central challenge to our future. There’s little excitement in knowing that Milwaukee is “second only to Detroit” in yet another measure of socioeconomic health. At the same time, the stigma of being the most segregated place in the country is a damaging one. As it turns out, it’s not necessarily legitimate.

Sometime next year, the 2010 Census should be completed and we will be able to see how Milwaukee stacks up in segregation and many other areas. In the meantime, it is still important to look at the impact that segregation has on our health and our future.

Later this week, I will be publishing a look at the connection between segregation and education. Stay tuned.

***

Race Matters in Milwaukee

Part I: How Segregated is Milwaukee?

Part Ia: How Segregated is Milwaukee? Part 2

Part II: The Causes of Milwaukee’s Segregation

Part III: The Effects of Milwaukee’s Segregation

Part IV: Segregation and Education

Milwaukee County 2nd District Special Election: 20 Questions With Wallace White


TMD recently invited Milwaukee County 2nd District candidates to answer some questions about who they are, why they’re running for office, and what their opinions on the issues of the day are. Below are the answers from Wallace White.

***

1. What is your current occupation?

Consultant to businesses.

2. How old are you?

76

3. Please tell us a bit more about yourself.

I have 35 years of experience in policy, planning and management of large government and business organizations.  I am currently Chairman of the African American Chamber of Commerce, MMSD Commissioner, Member of the Community Brainstorming Conference Executive Committee, Program Chair of the Milwaukee Area Workforce Investment Board (MAWIB), Instructor at Cardinal Stritch University, and Bradley Estates Neighborhood Organization Captain.

I was very active in the civil rights movement where I marched with Dr. King, worked with Jesse Jackson in Chicago and participated in Milwaukee with Father Groppi.  I was a street gang worker, a neighborhood organizer and a county welfare caseworker in Chicago. I am still very committed to community work and have a passion for working with people.  I am also a U.S. Army veteran where I learned leadership skills.

My grandparents moved to Milwaukee in 1892, my father and uncle were born here and they moved to Chicago in 1921.  I was born in Chicago and moved to Milwaukee in 1989.  My wife and I live in District 2 and attend New Testament Church.

I have a BA in social psychology from Roosevelt University and a Masters in Public Administration (MPA) from the University of Southern California.

4. Why do you want to be a County Supervisor?

I believe that with my experience and commitment I can make a difference in Milwaukee County government and a difference for the people who live in District 2.  I have the leadership and courage to stand up to the status quo to support needed change.

5. Why are you the right candidate for the job?

I am the right candidate because of my track record in creating positive change in government and in the community.  I led the change in MMSD procurement policy that has resulted in increased business opportunities for minority and small business.  I forged the development of the Bradley Estates Neighborhood Organization which is considered one of the largest block watches in Milwaukee.  As Chair of the Program Committee at MAWIB I have pressed for more accountability in job development and training programs.  I know that I can help create a more effective County government through active collaboration with the city, state and business communities.

6. As County Board Supervisor, what would your main priorities be?

My main priorities would be (1) to focus on addressing economic development issues—the lack of jobs has reached crisis level in Milwaukee and we need to take immediate action to address that; (2) build safe neighborhoods and work to prevent violence in the 2nd District: (3) save vital County services and increase accountability in government.

7. What are your main priorities for the 2nd District specifically?

These would be the same as my response in #6.

8. What will you bring to the County Board that you feel that it currently does not have?

Based on the informal feedback I have received about the Board, I believe that I would bring positive change in the following areas. My years of experience in bringing focus to issues that affect residents quality of life, my business experience in addressing efficiency and effectiveness in operations and a determination to be sure that there is fairness in County government.

9. Who are your role models?

Dr. Martin Luther King, Barack Obama, Sojourner Truth.

10. Which locally elected official, if any, would you pattern your legislative style after?

Congresswoman Gwen Moore

11. What would you do to uplift the Black community?

Develop and implement an agenda for the County government to become more proactive in addressing problems that affect the Black community.  Continue what I am doing to assist Black businesses in staying in business and becoming successful.  Provide hope and inspiration by involving our young people in understanding the importance of continuous education and how participation in government decision making affects us all.

12. Milwaukee County is facing extreme short-term and long-term budgetary pressures while trying to maintain and/or improve county services.  As a County Board Supervisor, what would you do to tackle this dilemma?

First of all I believe we should aggressively seek new sources of revenue and grants from both state and Federal governments.  There are opportunities there especially in the area of competitive grants.  Second, we should be more creative in addressing some budget issues, like seeking volunteer help or “adopt a park” programs before we consider more drastic approaches.   Finally, we may have to reduce services or raise taxes.

13. Numerous individuals have floated the idea of downsizing Milwaukee County government or consolidating the county with municipalities and with the state.  Where do you stand on this issue?

I believe that such consolidation would result in a reduction of fair political representation of the Black community in local government and would not necessarily improve services.

14. Would you approve of the privatization on any County services?  In what circumstances?  Why?

Based on my experiences, in the long term it is not cost effective for local government to privatize services.  While initially it may be less costly, over time privatization has shown itself to be more expensive than retaining agency employees.  Short term contracting out may be necessary to provide for technical or temporary support where the County does not have in house capability.

15. Metro Milwaukee is considered to be the most segregated metro area in the country.  Is this a problem?  If so, what would you do about it as a County Board Supervisor?  If it is not a problem, why not?

Of course it is a problem but it is difficult to see how a County Board Supervisor could break up long term structural segregation such as we have in Milwaukee.  In spite of this, I would start by identifying what has been done in other cities where progress has been made in dismantling segregation and plan to develop a model that could fit Milwaukee.  Next I would find other local leaders—including government, nonprofit, religious and business—who have the same concern about making changes in laws, policies and practices.  We then would develop goals, a timetable and implement the plan—however long it takes.

16. The County Board recently failed to approve a reduction in its own pension benefits and several of the “no” votes came from Supervisors who voted in favor of cutting pension for other County workers.  Was this the right vote?  If you get elected and have to vote for or against reducing your pension benefits, how will you vote?

I don’t know if it was the right vote—you would have to ask those Supervisors who voted.  I would vote to reduce my benefits.  I believe in fairness in the application of pain.

17. Who are you supporting for Governor?  Why?

Tom Barrett because his philosophy for the State is consistent with my goals.

18. Define Milwaukee in five words or less.

Declining/potential/uncertain future/hope

19. Define Milwaukee’s challenges in five words or less.

Vision/economic development/education/race

20. As County Supervisor, how would you encourage active citizen participation within the County and within your district?

Create a high level of communication at all times; ask people to contact me; respond to all inquiries within a defined time; open door policy without screened phone calls; hold community meetings and visit events in the District; hold myself responsible for commitments that I make; create social opportunities for us to gather.

Milwaukee County 2nd District Election: Invitation to the Candidates


The race to replace Toni Clark is on. Nine candidates have filed to be on the ballot. The primary is April 27th. The top two finishers will move on to the special election, which will be held on May 25th.

Here are the candidates:

  • Rob Cherry

System Redesign Coordinator, Milwaukee Addiction Treatment Initiative (Community Advocates)

  • Millie Coby

Millie Coby Ministries (unconfirmed)

  • Mike Erdmann

(?)

  • Corey Foster

Executive Director, Community Solutions Socioeconomic Development Center (self-owned organization, as of Feb. 2, 2008); finished a distant third in the 2008 7th aldermanic district primary (Willie Wade’s district)

  • Jo Anne Halada

(?)

  • Nikiya Harris

Official at Urban Ecology Center; Campaign website

  • ViAnna Jordan

Community Activist for Social Justice, Voter Rights and Civil Liberties; ran against Michael McGee Jr. in 2007

  • Walt Love

(?)

  • Carl S. Novak

(?)

  • Larry Spicer

Ran for Alderman in District 9 in 2004, finished third in primary behind Robert Puente and Thomas Melton.

  • Wallace White

Vice Chairman of the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Board (appointed by Mayor Tom Barrett)

Each of the candidates is invited to play 20 questions with TMD. Simply answer the questions below and send them to TMD. Your responses will be published, unedited, in a separate post. Also, if candidates wish to fill in or correct any of the information above, please contact TMD.

  1. What is your current occupation?
  2. How old are you?
  3. Please tell us a bit more about yourself.
  4. Why do you want to be a County Supervisor?
  5. Why are you the right candidate for the job?
  6. As County Board Supervisor, what would your main priorities be?
  7. What are your main priorities for the 2nd District specifically?
  8. What will you bring to the County Board that you feel it currently does not have?
  9. Who are your role models?
  10. Which locally elected official, if any, would you pattern your legislative style after?
  11. What would you do to uplift the black community?
  12. Milwaukee County is facing extreme short-term and long-term budgetary pressures while trying to maintain and/or improve county services. As a County Board Supervisor, what would you do to tackle this dilemma?
  13. Numerous individuals have floated the idea of downsizing Milwaukee county government or consolidating the county with municipalities and with the state. Where do you stand on this issue?
  14. Would you approve of the privatization of any county services? In what circumstances? Why?
  15. Metro Milwaukee is considered to be the most segregated metro area in the country. Is this a problem? If so, what would you do about it as a County Board Supervisor? If it is not a problem, why not?
  16. The county board recently failed to approve a reduction in its own pension benefits, and several of the ‘no’ votes came from Supervisors who voted in favor of cutting pensions for other county workers. Was this the right vote? If you get elected and have to vote for or against reducing your pension benefits, how will you vote?
  17. Who are you supporting for governor? Why?
  18. Define Milwaukee in five words or less.
  19. Define Milwaukee’s challenges in five words or less.
  20. As County Supervisor, how would you encourage active citizen participation within the county and within your district?

Good luck to all of the candidates!

Received Responses: