The Black Conservative Town Hall 2013


FOX’s Sean Hannity Show hosted a Black Conservative Town hall and since then this video has spread like wild fire. It brought up issues many people liberal and conservative alike could relate to. Blacks began to find that there are not wide divisions between their conservative counterparts and themselves. This could be a great start for Blacks as we need to come together and start healing and talking to form the new Underground Railroad. Seeing that we really have more in common than differences will start to break down the walls of division and help us to start to focus on the true enemy that keeps us from moving forward.
This is a great video that needs to be shared in its entirety. Many people want to know about the elusive Black Conservative. Well here is a segment of us in a town hall answering questions and talking about issues and matters near and dear to our hearts.
I am sure if people listen to this with an open mind they will find some pieces where they can agree and find common bonds. The differences, well as I always say; We shall have to agree to disagree. However this video is very interesting and is great food for discussion.
Peace Family,
WW

BAIT & SWITCH


Pack the Hall

BAIT & SWITCH

Dollar Tree does a Rope-A-Dope or Milwaukee Black Community comes through with the right hook….

While we wait on a few key statements from the mayor and others there are important meetings and notices you need to be aware of. We at the Drum want to give you this information post haste.

6th District Meeting

HOWEVER:

First off if Dollar Tree moves forth it is in large part because Black Milwaukee did not seize its “AH HA” moment. The power is now in the hands of Black Milwaukee and Black Milwaukee alone.

SIGN THE PETITION, CALL THE MAYOR/GOVERNOR & DOLLAR TREE (Does it really take that much time? For something that will impact us for generations to come). Hell there is an online petition how hard can it be to make your power felt? You don’t even have to move out your house.

After talking with Common Council President Willie Hines (and we will quote him more at a later date), we feel very confident Alderman Hines is respectfully allowing Alderwoman Coggs to lead the council and respect her authority in the matter. “We are listening to the people!” said Hines and I do believe him.

However we have yet to hear from the mayor despite repeated attempts to communicate with him and the governor. He got till tomorrow before “in person” visits start. We ain’t the Journal. I ain’t got no journalistic rules or codes and he owes us!!

Contact Mayor Barrett:

Office of the Mayor

200 E. Wells Street/City Hall Rm.201

Milwaukee, WI 53202     Phone: (414) 286-2200

FAX: (414) 286-3191/Email: mayor@milwaukee.gov

Calm yourselves, peep game…Yes the shelves are filling up but that might be tactic and strategy. So do not let that stop you from signing petitions, going to meetings, calling the mayor and using your power.

Dollar Tree Ownership wants you to feel defeated. This is the led astray, bamboozled, etc… strategy and some are falling for it. Don’t be fooled people. BUT DO NOTICE WHO IS NOT HERE TO HELP OUR CAUSE!! Representatives and organizations who claim to have our back around election time. You need to remember their absence in this! This is an important moment in our time because every group and community has an economic power base in our city EXCEPT BLACK MILWAUKEE!! WHY? YOU KNOW WHY!! It was taken away by Mayor Hoan and kept away by Mayor Barrett if he refuses to help us now!!!!

Contact Dollar Tree

http://www.dollartree.com/custserv/contactus.jsp

http://www.dollartreeinfo.com/

So attend a meeting, share information, sign petitions, collect signatures, get involved and be a part of history! Do not let our “ah ha”  moment pass us by!

Online Petition Information:

http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/stop-the-dollar-tree-in-bronzeville.html

Collect Signatures and Download the Petition:

Dollar Tree Petition

Worth sharing…

Some of the online petition comments have been outstanding so I want to share them:

“Cheap foods, high medical costs” (I hope Republicans are taking note)

“Dollar Tree has been accused of treating workers very poorly”

“Dollar Tree goes against everything family/community is”

“Fresh foods…eat to live”

Peace Family,

WW

american_ww_gold2

Wonder Woman is a community activist and blogger and Chair of The Umoja Project, a Black Conservative Movement in Wisconsin.

She is a proud member of the JustUs League!

She has her own blog site at http://www/wonder2woman.blogspot.com

She also contributes to The Milwaukee Drum, the Black Convo Network, Insane Asylum Blog, and Black Bloggers Connect.

Contact info:

wonder2woman (Twitter)/411wonderwoman@gmail.com

Harry Belafonte Calls Out Jay-Z and Beyonce for Selfishness!


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In case you missed this article it is worth taking the time to read Brother Belafonte’s words and ingest his food for our starving souls. Although only two are mentioned by name, this article pertains to many of the Blacks that we patronize in the entertainment, athletic, and all money making communities. The next time we idolize and run to give our money to these people let’s think about how they support us. Their “little” foundations may help them sleep at night, but are they really helping us sleep at night? They have the access and ability to create true Black Economic Empowerment that would sustain us all but yet look where Blacks are in 2013 still with our hands out. These people should be creating lasting Black enterprises that build up our communities, schools, youth and family organizations, and churches so we too are self sufficient. That is what those how came before them did FOR THEM! Instead they are buying little pieces of teams, making “car” music that we certainly cannot afford and other silly materialistic things “N” in Paris? Really?  We should be investing into a sustainable future for the whole instead of the few. But without the community “sounding the alarm” they will continue to think their lifestyles are okay and we are in agreement. After all silence is complacence and we have been far too silent for too long. It is time we demand that our brothers and sisters who take so much from us give much more in these tough economic times. From whom much is given, much is required right?  

Peace Family,

WW

 

Harry Belafonte Calls Out Jay-Z and Beyonce for Selfishness

Originally published in

http://www.kulturekritic.com/2012/08/news/harry-belafonte-calls-out-jay-z-and-beyonce-for-selfishness/

by Dr. Boyce Watkins, KultureKritic.com

Harry Belafonte, who did a great deal of work for the black community during the Civil Rights Movement, is making no secret of the fact that he’s very disappointed in many young black celebrities when it comes to social activism.  Speaking this week with the Hollywood Reporter, Belafonte pointed out Jay-Z and Beyonce as prime examples of what he’s talking about.

THR: Back to the occasion of the award for your acting career. Are you happy with the image of members of minorities in Hollywood today?

Belafonte: Not at all. They have not told the history of our people, nothing of who we are. We are still looking. We are not determined. We are not driven by some technology that says you can kill Afghanistans, the Iraquis or the Spanish. It is all – excuse my French – s**t. It is sad. And I think one of the great abuses of this modern time is that we should have had such high-profile artists, powerful celebrities. But they have turned their back on social responsibility. That goes for Jay-Z and Beyoncé, for example. Give me Bruce Springsteen, and now you’re talking. I really think he is black.

My friend Alexis Stodghill at TheGrio makes the point (in a news piece where she carefully cites both sides of the issue) that perhaps Belafonte is off-base with his critique.  She notes that Beyonce has spoken up for her fellow recording artist Frank Ocean when he admitted that he was gay, and that Jay-Z has chumed it up with President Obama during his presidential campaign and supported him on the issue of gay marriage.

We must note that Beyonce and Jay-Z speaking up on gay marriage and homosexuality is little more than a political decision designed to remain in alignment with the Obama presidency.  If Barack had said nothing on the issue, Jay-Z would have said nothing.  So, we have to be sure not to mistake meaningful advocacy for elitist political shoulder-rubbing (wealthy famous people tend to take care of one another).

But when you look at the black aristocracy that is known as Jay-Z and Beyonce, one form of activism that is missing is anything that involves the words “poor black people.” Also, when it comes to issues that affect the least of us, including poverty, mass incarceration, urban violence, unequal educational systems and the like, it’s easy to say that Jay-Z and Beyonce have been effectively missing in action, unless it’s time to show up and utilize this audience to sell albums.

One exception noted by Kirsten West Savali at NewsOne.com is the Shawn Carter foundation, created by Jay-Z and the people who work for him.  According to the foundation’s website, “Since the Foundation’s inception, over 750 students have received awards totaling over $1.3 million dollars.”

<insert WW-$1.3 mil but a lunch outing for them? Come on. Let’s be real she bought him a jet and he bought her an island. Surely they can buy poor blacks fine arts programs, quality education, and clothes, foods, etc…>

Jay-Z should certainly be commended for doing something he didn’t have to do, but let’s really think about this for a second, shall we?  First, most corporations have some kind of foundation.  Even Wal-Mart can claim to have sent thousands of kids to college, as they simultaneously strip workers of their rights around the world, drive small companies out of business and refuse to pay a living wage to their employees.  Secondly, if you divide the $1.3 million given away by the foundation by 750 scholarship recipients, that’s about $1,733 per child.  Please tell me what college in America has a tuition bill of $1,733?  Of course Jay-Z gives away more than most of us can afford, but even the local drug dealer can also afford to use heroin money give away turkeys at Christmas.  The point here is that if I pillage half a billion dollars from the black community over a 10-year period, it’s pretty easy for me to give back $1.3 million of it.

I noticed a line in Jay-Z’s song “n****z in Paris,” where he says, “Can you see the private jets flying over you?”  This line is part of a consistent message of black elitism that has become all-too prevalent in the entertainment industry. It is a statement which says, “I’m better than you, and I am not one of you.  Your job is to either worship me or hate on me, I don’t care which one.”

Beyond the “extensive” efforts of his foundation, Jay-Z is also the man who earned over $63 million dollars last year and only gave $6,000 to charity.  Unfortunately, this has become par for the course in a world where poor black people are not nearly as fashionable of a cause as gay white kids from the suburbs.  Poor black kids can’t buy your records, rendering them effectively useless.

So, while Beyonce and Jay-Z speaking up on marriage equality is a politely cute form of activism, you have to agree with Belafonte that today’s artists are taught not to care about anyone other than themselves.  At best, we might get a photo op at a charity event, but the real pressure to sacrifice for those who are suffering is lost as millions of us forgive celebrities for being unwilling to use their power to make the world a better place.  The rule is simple:  If you’re rich, we love you.  It doesn’t matter if you’re a former crack dealer (Jay-Z), brag about murdering women and children (Lil Wayne) or sleep with middle school kids on the weekends (R. Kelly).  Money is used to wash away all sins, and people are quicker to disrespect an icon like Harry Belafonte than they are to challenge celebrities to do more than tweet pictures of their newborn baby.

By “social responsibility,” I don’t think that Belafonte is referring to charity concerts or speaking to Congress about saving dolphins.  He’s talking about the kind of activism that requires b***s.  He’s talking about the black men and women during the 1960s who used their voices loud and clear to state that things need to change in America soon, or else.

Those days are long gone.  In the 1960s, oppression was much more rampant, so nearly every black person was banging on the door of equality.  Today, those who’ve been allowed access to predominantly white institutions are asked to sign a “Good negro forever” card, and disavow any meaningful political stands that might get them into trouble with a corporate sponsor or record label.  As a result, we have a group of celebrities who are very quick to build their brands off the “street cred” granted to them by impoverished African Americans, but don’t feel compelled to use those brands to become anything other than corporate-sponsored slumlords.

So, a “gangsta rapper” can speak all day about his time in prison, but he dare not say anything about the fact that the United States incarcerates more of its citizens than any country in the world, earning billions on the backs of black men and women, destroying millions of families in the process. He can rap all about “all his homies that done passed away,” but he’s better off staying away from a conversation about how gun violence is fueled by manufacturers who are happy to build profitable corporate tools to fund black male genocide.

It is the lack of acknowledgement of the deep and piercing artifacts of black oppression that bother Belafonte and others the most.  It’s what bothers me too, for I’ve always been raised to believe that (to recite the words of Spiderman’s Uncle Ben) great power comes with great responsibility.

Perhaps when Jay-Z really understands what wealth is all about, he can take a note from Warren Buffett, Oprah and others, who’ve convinced several billionaires to give half of their wealth to charity when they die.  A billion dollars is far more than enough for one family so why not use the rest of save 1,000 families?   Is it nothing less than utterly shameful to have 10 houses, 15 cars, 200 expensive suits and several private planes?  Maybe there is a point where such gluttony should not be celebrated by the rest of us, and instead be called out as pathetic in a world where millions of children are going to die this year from starvation.

Anyone who disagrees with me might want to consider the fact that there is nothing consistent with the teachings of Jesus about letting innocent people starve while you’re burning money in your basement.  The principled stands by men like Muhammad Ali, who gave away nearly everything to stand up for his values, are virtually non-existence when our leading artists write songs about excessive materialism, getting high and drunk every day, killing other black men and unhealthy s****l promiscuity.  Belafonte is right on point and we should look to our elders to remind us of what it means to live a purposeful and righteous life.

Harry Belafonte, by speaking up at the age of 85, is effectively asking that young people pick up the baton that he’s been running since Dr. King was a teenager.  But instead of picking up the baton, we’ve thrown it at his feet and signed ourselves up for corporate slavery. I congratulate Harry for taking a stand on this important issue, and I am hopeful that his courage can spark the cultural revolution necessary to make our people stronger as a result.

Way to go Harry, I respect you.

Dr. Boyce Watkins is a professor at Syracuse University and founder of the Your Black World Coalition.

 american_ww_gold2

Wonder Woman is a community activist and blogger.

She is a proud member of the JustUs League!

She has her own blog site at http://www/wonder2woman.blogspot.com

She also contributes to The Milwaukee Drum, the Black Convo Network, Insane Asylum Blog, and Black Bloggers Connect.

Contact info:

wonder2woman (Twitter)

411wonderwoman@gmail.com

 

 

Black revolution must start now even without total Black Unity.


Image 

PRESS RELEASE*****PRESS RELEASE*****PRESS RELEASE*****PRESS RELEASE…PRESS

PLEASE STOP WAITING ON ‘BLACK UNITY’ TO START THE REVOLUTION.”

You hear it every day.  “Man, if Black people would just come together we could” or “All we need is unity among Black folks and everything….” Most Black people have/had some romantic notions of ALL Black people, with afros and dashikis marching towards New Africa, with the Isley Brothers, “Caravan of Love” playing in the background. Reality is probably going to look more like what were seeing with the Occupy movements and Arab Spring, different groups of Black folk doing different things  at different times in different places for similar outcomes.  That is just fine.  No people in history have ever been totally united on anything.  Egypt was not totally united, Rome or Greece were not totally united. All South African Blacks didn’t support Nelson Mandela and all Negroes didn’t support Dr. Martin L. King Jr. Black people come in all different shapes, sizes and colors.  They have different DNA, life experiences and  want different things.  The common thread is the history of suffering and oppression along with a destiny to resurrect the community and homeland. This reality is being created now. Yes, The revolution has started.  Its going on now and its personal.  You are the revolution.  You and the person(s) you are with are the army.  Start today with whomever you are with, wherever you are. Get involved, you are whats missing..  No one can do everything yet everyone can do something.  If you sit in front of the t.v. or computer with the young people at your home and explain to them whats going on in the world….That is Black revolution. The Black problem now is not lack of unity but ignorance and fear..

While we  are here, does anyone remember the “Good ole days”?  Well, thats a lie  that old heads use to  dump this current crop of bs on the laps of young people.  The history books have no record of a time in Black American history that can be sanely called  the “Good ole Days.”  Black people have always caught and continue to catch pure d hell in America. Blacks never all got alone or all worked together. Even during segregation there was backstabbing and boot-lickin going on then as now, Black Wall Street and Rosewood notwithstanding.  There are wealthy Black towns and neighborhoods today yet they hardly represent the state of Black America. Every generation has had victories and failures in the struggle for Black liberation

The time for action is now.  We are the continuation of the struggles of our ancestors.

He who waits for the perfect time to plant, never plants…The Bible

Power to the people.  Peace.

Calling All Civil Rights Leaders Past & Present in Milwaukee


Between 1958 and 1970, a distinctive movement for racial justice emerged from unique circumstances in Milwaukee. A series of local leaders inspired growing numbers of people to participate in campaigns….

Calling All Civil Rights Leaders in Milwaukee

“We Are The Drum – A Rhythm In Wisconsin” – 2012

Since 1990, CAPITA Productions (City At Peace In The Arts) founded by Brother Booker Ashe and others has been presenting a Black History Program yearly for thousands in the Greater Milwaukee Area. 

This year we are adding a very special and overdue segment which will celebrate those brave marchers and demonstrators, from all backgrounds, who risked their lives for the cause of civil rights, especially in Milwaukee. It will be a dramatic reenactment of the Underground Railroad, prominent in the Waukesha area; the escaped slave Joshua Grover, and Fr. Jim Groppi’s “March on Milwaukee”.

For 200 consecutive nights hundreds marched for open housing through rain, snow and fear of physical attacks. These heroes have not been properly honored until now. Their stories should be known by our youth as well as everyone in Milwaukee and across the nation.

We are calling on those who lived this experience to share their stories with us in special listening sessions on Tuesday, November 15th and Wednesday November 16th from 5 pm to 8 pm and again November 19th from 10 am to 1 pm. We will meet at North Division Room #102, 1011 West Center Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

We are looking for all those who participated in the demonstrations, served on the NAACP Youth Council, Commandos, and all organizations that led or joined in some way, the historic Milwaukee’s Civil Rights Movement.

If you are interested in attending and would like more information please call 414-397-8661 or email arsmusic00@aol.com. (zero, zero). Otherwise we would love to see you at the meetings. Please share this announcement with everyone. We want to make sure we honor and thank you for your courage and brave acts that moved Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and the nation so powerfully.

Thank you,

CAPITA Productions

An excerpt taken from

The Selma of the North:

Civil Rights Insurgency in Milwaukee

Patrick D Jones

Between 1958 and 1970, a distinctive movement for racial justice emerged from unique circumstances in Milwaukee. A series of local leaders inspired growing numbers of people to participate in campaigns against employment and housing discrimination, segregated public schools, the membership of public officials in discriminatory organizations, welfare cuts, and police brutality.

The Milwaukee movement culminated in the dramatic—and sometimes violent—1967 open housing campaign. A white Catholic priest, James Groppi, led the NAACP Youth Council and Commandos in a militant struggle that lasted for 200 consecutive nights and provoked the ire of thousands of white residents. After working-class mobs attacked demonstrators, some called Milwaukee “the Selma of the North.” Others believed the housing campaign represented the last stand for a nonviolent, interracial, church-based movement.

“We Are The Drum – A Rhythm In Wisconsin” – 2012 Show Dates:

 

Public Shows:

Fri, Feb. 24th, Sat., Feb. 25th, Fri. Mar. 3rd & Sat., Mar. 4th at 7:30 pm-

Tickets will go on sale on Dec. 1st

Student Shows:

The dates are: Tues. Feb.21st, Wed, Feb. 22nd, Mon., Feb.27th

 & Wed. Feb. 29th at 10am & 12 pm. tickets are $4 per child.

For more info on the student shows, call Liz Coleman- 414-807-7322

You can find more about CAPITA by visiting us on our Facebook Page

www.facebook.com/pages/Capita-Productions

or Twitter @CAPITAProd