30 Americans on Display at Milwaukee Art Museum


30 Americans logo

30 Americans on Display at Milwaukee Art Museum
June 14–September 8, 2013

(Remember 1st Thursdays are free at the MAM!!)

Milwaukee Art Museum Website http://mam.org/30-americans/

Taken from Milwaukee Art Museum description….
30 Americans is a dynamic exploration of contemporary American art. Paintings, sculptures, installations, photographs, video, and more made by African American artists since 1970 raise questions of what it means to be a contemporary artist and an African American today. Whether addressing issues of race, gender, sexuality, politics, or history—or seemingly remaining silent about them—these works offer powerful interpretations of cultural identity and artistic legacy.

Artists from 30 Americans
30 Americans is drawn from the acclaimed holdings of the Rubell Family Foundation in Miami, Florida. New Yorkers Don and Mera Rubell began acquiring contemporary art in the late 1960s. Through their friendships with living artists, particularly young artists, the Rubells collected backwards and forwards, creating networks of intergenerational influence. As a result, the works that comprise the exhibition offer a stylistic conversation among artists of different decades and generations. Minimalism, abstraction, conceptualism, performance, new media, installation art, identity politics, deconstruction, street aesthetics, and the return of figuration—every major development in contemporary art over the past four decades is represented.
Provocative, beautiful, humorous, at times painful, and always deeply compelling, 30 Americans is a dazzling presentation of some of the best art made in the last forty years—and a captivating guide to some of the most exciting talent working today.

 
Wisconsin 30 Also on Display
In conjunction with 30 Americans, the Museum presents Wisconsin 30, a parallel exhibition featuring paintings, photographs, prints, drawings, and sculpture by thirty Wisconsin African American artists. This intergenerational exhibition presents a complementary overview of the themes of race and identity explored in 30 Americans, with a focused lens on Wisconsin.

Ras ‘Ammar Nsoroma (born Kevin Wayne Tate) is well known for his murals. After studying at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Nsoroma returned to Wisconsin as a freelance artist, designing three-dimensional murals on the Fond du Lac Avenue overpass. Since then, Nsoroma has painted over forty murals, including pieces in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, DC.

Ras ‘Ammar Nsoroma (born Kevin Wayne Tate) is well known for his murals. After studying at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Nsoroma returned to Wisconsin as a freelance artist, designing three-dimensional murals on the Fond du Lac Avenue overpass. Since then, Nsoroma has painted over forty murals, including pieces in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, DC.

Wisconsin 30 is organized by the Museum, in coordination with Sande Robinson, president, Milwaukee Art Museum’s African American Art Alliance, and Lynne Shumow, curator of education, Haggerty Museum of Art, Marquette University.

http://mam.org/30-americans/wisconsin-30.php

Programs & Events in Conjunction with the Display
http://mam.org/30-americans/programs.php
Express Talk: 30 Americans
Thursday, July 11, 2013, 12 PM
Explore 30 Americans in 30 minutes and discover the provocative work of some of the most important African American artists of the last three decades.
Baker/Rowland Galleries
Free with Museum admission
Panel Discussion: Why Here?
Thursday, July 11, 2013, 6:15 PM
Explore the TypeFace public art project, with artists Reginald Baylor and Adam Carr, whose installations in the Harambee, Sherman Park, Lindsay Heights, and Burnham Park neighborhoods will draw on community responses to the question, why here? And hear from artists represented in Wisconsin 30, the complementary exhibition to 30 Americans, as they discuss the question in reference to their choice to remain in Wisconsin.
Lubar Auditorium
Free with Museum admission

Gallery Talk: 30 Americans
Tuesday, July 16, 2013, 1:30 PM
Hear about the artists and the provocative works in the 30 Americans exhibition on a guided tour. This dynamic exploration of contemporary American art presents nearly eighty paintings, sculptures, photographs, installations, and videos by many of the most important African American artists of the last three decades. Whether addressing issues of race, gender, sexuality, or politics—or, in some instances, remaining silent about them—these works offer powerful interpretations of cultural identity and artistic legacy.
Baker/Rowland Galleries
Free with Museum admission

Express Talk: 30 Americans
Thursday, July 18, 2013, 12 PM
Explore 30 Americans in 30 minutes and discover the provocative work of some of the most important African American artists of the last three decades.
Baker/Rowland Galleries
Free with Museum admission

Book Salon: The Devil Finds Work
Saturday, July 20, 2013, 10:30 AM
Join other book enthusiasts this summer for lively discussions at the Milwaukee Art Museum. This series features books related to the 30 Americans exhibition.
July 20: The Devil Finds Work by James Baldwin
August 17: Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
In The Devil Finds Work, James Baldwin challenges the underlying assumptions in such films as In the Heat of the Night, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, and The Exorcist, offering a vision of America’s self-delusions and deceptions. Here are our loves and hates, biases and cruelties, fears and ignorance, reflected by the films that have entertained us and shaped our consciousness. Here, too, is the stunning prose of a writer whose passion never diminished his struggle for equality, justice, and social change.
RSVP to adults@mam.org or 414-224-3826. Books are available from the Museum Store.
Quadracci Suite
Free with Museum admission
Kohl’s Art Generation Family Sundays: Art of the Now

30 Americans Website
http://www2.corcoran.org/30americans/home

The Black Conservative Town Hall 2013


FOX’s Sean Hannity Show hosted a Black Conservative Town hall and since then this video has spread like wild fire. It brought up issues many people liberal and conservative alike could relate to. Blacks began to find that there are not wide divisions between their conservative counterparts and themselves. This could be a great start for Blacks as we need to come together and start healing and talking to form the new Underground Railroad. Seeing that we really have more in common than differences will start to break down the walls of division and help us to start to focus on the true enemy that keeps us from moving forward.
This is a great video that needs to be shared in its entirety. Many people want to know about the elusive Black Conservative. Well here is a segment of us in a town hall answering questions and talking about issues and matters near and dear to our hearts.
I am sure if people listen to this with an open mind they will find some pieces where they can agree and find common bonds. The differences, well as I always say; We shall have to agree to disagree. However this video is very interesting and is great food for discussion.
Peace Family,
WW

TMD Spotlight: Author Douglas J. Gladstone “A Bitter Cup of Coffee”


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Mr. Gladstone contacted TMD via email and asked us to consider posting the following information relative to his book. Not only is it relevant for Black History (the month is extracted on purpose), but it also has local connection with the Brewers. Support this work and get this book.

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Bernie Smith, a 61-year-old African American who played eight seasons of minor league baseball with the New York Mets before catching on as a reserve outfielder for the Milwaukee Brewers, is one of nearly 900 men who don’t receive pensions and health insurance from Major League Baseball.

Smith played during a time, between 1947 and 1979, when you needed to accrue four years of service credit to become vested in MLB’s pension plan. In 1980, that threshold was lowered to what it’s been ever since: one day of service to become eligible to but into the league’s umbrella health insurance coverage, and 43 game days of service to qualify for a retirement benefit.

Unfortunately for men like Smith, Herb Washington, Billy Harrell, Wayne Cage and other African American ballplayers, that new requirement was never made retroactive for the pre-1980 players. So nearly 900 men fell between the cracks and now find themselves on the outside looking in.

My book, A Bitter Cup of Coffee, tells the true story about a group of former big-league ballplayers denied pensions as a result of the failure of both the league and the union to retroactively amend the vesting requirement change that granted instant pension eligibility to ballplayers in 1980.

As a result of all the publicity my book generated, in April 2011, MLB and the players’ association announced with much fanfare that all these men would receive life annuities totaling up to $10,000 per year, based on the service credit they accrued. Regrettably, the payment plan still doesn’t permit them to be covered by health insurance, nor can a payment be passed onto a designated beneficiary, wife, child or loved one when the man dies.

The complicated payment formula permits each man to receive up to $625 for every quarter of service they accrued while on a major league roster, up to 16 quarters or four years. So a man who, say, is credited with one year of service would receive a gross check of $2,500. A man who is credited with, say, 3 1/4 years would receive a gross check of $8,125.

In the latter example, a player who accrued 3 1/4 years of service would actually receive a net amount of only $5,900, since MLB does not issue W4-P forms to these retirees so they can determine how much should be taken out for taxes.

Given that MLB is a $8 billion industry, most of the players believe that they have been thrown the equivalent of a bone. It was appeasement at its most obvious.

Smith is among the men who received monies in September 2011; a second life annuity was disbursed to him last January, while his third payment was supposed to have been disbursed to him last month.

In the recently unveiled collective bargaining agreement between the union and the league, these life annuities were extended through 2016.

Born in Ponchatoula, Louisiana in September 1941, Calvin Bernard “Bernie” Smith attended Southern University, the historically black college located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and played for the Jaguars of the Southwestern Atlantic Conference in 1960 and 1961. He and Hall of Famer Lou Brock both played for the Jaguars in 1960.

After bouncing around the Mets minor league system, Smith made it to The Show as a member of the Milwaukee Brewers in 1970, when he went 21 for 76, inclduing three doubles, one triple and one homerun. All told, in his abbreviated career, Smith only appeared in 59 games; he came up to the plate 112 times, scored nine runs and was credited with nine runs batted in.

In 1973, Smith managed the Danville Warriors, a Class A farm team in Danville, Illinois affiliated with the Brewers, and guided them to a 66-57 record in the Midwest League. The Warriors lost the Midwest League Finals that season.

I’ve said on numerous occasions that this whole disgraceful chapter in labor relations was a terrible inequity and injustice that stained baseball’s history. Although the life annuity plan is a step in the right direction, I hope that both the league and the union will ultimately restore these men into pension coverage.

I have attached a front cover image for your information. I am also sending you a link to the book’s official website. It can be accessed at: http://www.abittercupofcoffee.com.

The book was published on April 14, 2010. Once again, thank you, in advance, for your attention to this email. If you’d like to speak with me directly, feel free to call me on my cell at 1-518-817-8253.